A Future Force to be Reckoned With

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Max Andrews is definitely a force to be reckoned with in the future of philosophical and apologetic debate.

Much of his writing takes mental effort, but he cannot help but let his C.S. Lewis-esque heart and passion bleed through.

He has published a compendium of sorts…

http://sententias.org/2013/06/09/philsci-directory/

Valuable resource to say the least.

Thank you Max!

A Future Philosopher Blossoms from the Tragic Soil of Life

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This promising, humble young man has already learned the secret lessons of tragedy in the school of Christ. He truly deserves our prayerful support.

Read his blog here…

http://christmyredeemer.wordpress.com/2013/05/30/a-brief-retelling-of-my-journey-to-philosophy-and-a-request-to-help-for-my-opportunity-in-oxford/

Love, Worship and the Divine Will – C.S. Lewis

Who could be more passionate in dialogue than the person I consider to be that dearest of all philosophers of the Twentieth Century? Smart enough to be dispassionate, wise enough to be nothing other than…

Those Divine demands which sound to our natural ears most like those of a despot and least like those of a lover, in fact marshal us where we should want to go if we knew what we wanted. He demands our worship, our obedience, our prostration. Do we suppose that they can do Him any good, or fear, like the chorus in Milton, that human irreverence can bring about ‘His glory’s diminution’? A man can no more diminish God’s glory by refusing to worship Him than a lunatic can put out the sun by scribbling the word ‘darkness’ on the walls of his cell. But God wills our good, and our good is to love Him (with that responsive love proper to creatures) and to love Him we must know Him: and if we know Him, we shall in fact fall on our faces. If we do not, that only shows that what we are trying to love is not yet God—though it may be the nearest approximation to God which our thought and fantasy can attain. Yet the call is not only to prostration and awe; it is to a reflection of the Divine life, a creaturely participation in the Divine attributes which is far beyond our present desires. We are bidden to ‘put on Christ’, to become like God. That is, whether we like it or not, God intends to give us what we need, not what we now think we want. Once more, we are embarrassed by the intolerable compliment, by too much love, not too little.

C.S. Lewis, The Problem of Pain (New York: HarperCollins Publishers, 1996), pp. 46-47.

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